Best HDMI 2.1 Monitors for the PS5

The release of the latest PS5 console by Sony brought many changes not just in specs, but in the peripherals that you can effectively use it with. Unlike the PS4 which only provides rough upscaling through 1080p and 4K and locked to just 30 FPS, we now have true 1080p, and relatively true 4K resolution playing at either 120 or 60 FPS.

On PC, the easiest way to enjoy these resolutions and refresh rates is by using a Displayport. Unfortunately, PS5 doesn’t support this type of media connection. Instead, it uses an HDMI 2.1 port for its next-generation connection standard, and as such requires a worthy monitor with the same updated connection standard to achieve the best of what it can visually offer.

Basic Monitor Requirements for PS5

Credit by Kārlis Dambrāns via Flickr

HDMI 2.1 support – technically HDMI 2.0 will work just fine, and simply using an HDMI 2.0 monitor might be the more economical choice if using a 1080p monitor. If you intend to go 4K UHD at 120Hz, though, you absolutely need an HDMI 2.1 monitor and HDMI 2.1 certified cable.

16:9 (Widescreen) aspect ratio – as of now, there is no official support for 21:9 ultrawide monitors for the PS5. You can use one, But it won’t be as optimized as a standard 16:9. As such, the more economical option is to stick to regular widescreen.

4K UHD or 1080p FHD – the PS5 also doesn’t have the option to natively support 1440p. The PS5 will simply attempt to output a 1080p display with such a monitor. 4K, however, works properly, so our ideal target would be 4K unless you need a budget option.

60Hz or 144Hz – If you need something that can be set up at a lower cost go for 4K 60Hz. For higher refresh rates go 144Hz, as it is the typical “entry-level” refresh rate for gaming monitors. It’s pointless to buy anything higher anyway even if it is available since the PS5 is maxed at 120Hz.

IPS display (for 60-120Hz gaming) – today’s competitive IPS offerings generally look more vibrant and have significantly faster response times that virtually eliminate any ghosting or dark smearing. If you’re aiming for lower 60Hz scaled upwards to 120Hz, this will be the default recommendation.

VA display (120Hz gaming) – VA panels may be notorious for slower response times, but for higher overdrive settings and faster refresh rates (100Hz above), the sensation of ghosting and dark smearing can be virtually eliminated. VA displays also tend to be significantly cheaper than IPS, while still having exclusive advantages of their own such as very deep blacks and more natural color tones. In some rare models, VA weaknesses simply don’t exist at all, while still reaping all the color-rich benefits of the screen technology, such as the Odyssey G7 32-inch from Samsung.

4K UHD is Good, But 1080p still Matters for HDMI 2.1

Yes, 1080p is still good enough for the PS5. While the biggest inherent advantage of HDM 2.1 is the ability to output 4K UHD at higher refresh rates using an HDMI port, there are still a few benefits of the updated standard that can be experienced on 1080p monitors:

Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) – also known as Auto Game Mode. It’s simply an option to enhance the speed of your controller inputs as it is shown in-game/on-screen.

Chroma Subsampling – 4K 120Hz will display 10-bit 4:4:4 color ratio, as opposed to 4:2:2 or 4:2:0. In other terms, the effective color information per 8×8 pixel is effectively doubled/quadrupled.

Enhanced Audio Return Channel (eARC) – assuming you even use the monitor for audio, which we assume you simply don’t.

HDMI 2.1 Monitors for PS5 Overview:

Product Name Notable Specifications Check on Amazon
Gigabyte M28U Size: 28-inch (16:9)

Resolution: 3840×2160
Refresh Rate: 144Hz

Panel Type: IPS

Color Gamut: 99.8% sRGB, 82.4% Adobe, 84.0% DCI-P3

Link
Gigabyte Aorus FV43U Size: 43-inch (16:9)

Resolution: 3840×2160
Refresh Rate: 144Hz

Panel Type: VA

Color Gamut: 99.1% sRGB, 98.4% Adobe, 87.8% DCI-P3

Link
Asus TUF Gaming VG28UQL1A Size: 28-inch (16:9)

Resolution: 3840×2160
Refresh Rate: 144Hz

Panel Type: IPS

Color Gamut: 98.2% sRGB, 78.7% Adobe, 83.4% DCI-P3

Link
Samsung Odyssey G70A Size: 28-inch (16:9)

Resolution: 3840×2160
Refresh Rate: 144Hz

Panel Type: IPS

Color Gamut: 99.2% sRGB, 83.2% Adobe, 87.5% DCI-P3

Link
LG Ultragear 27GP950 Size: 27-inch (16:9)

Resolution: 3840×2160
Refresh Rate: 144Hz

Panel Type: IPS

Color Gamut: 100% sRGB, Adobe 88.1%, 95.2% DCI-P3

Link

Gigabyte M28U, 28-inch 4K UHD 144Hz IPS
(Editor’s Choice Award)

Size: 28-inch (16:9)
Resolution: 3840×2160 (4K UHD)
Refresh Rate: 144Hz
Panel Type: IPS
Peak Brightness: 350 nits
Contrast Ratio: 1,000:1
Color Gamut: 99.8% sRGB, 82.4% Adobe, 84.0% DCI-P3
Best G2G Response: 4 ms
Dark Transition: Less than 10 ms (4 ms)
Input Lag: 4 ms (average)
VRR: (reference only) Freesync (rated), G-SYNC (usable)
Ergonomics: Height, Tilt, Swivel


Advantages:

  • Astounding price-to-performance
  • Complete ergonomic adjustability
  • Full suite of USB connection options

Disadvantages:

  • HDR400 is garbage as usual

If you need a desktop multi-purpose monitor that can also double as a very excellent, S-tier PS5 monitor without breaking the bank, then the M28U is the best choice you can ever have. It is overall a very compelling product for the number and quality of its feature over its retail price, and perhaps even more for those who have adjustability and extra connectivity in mind.

Gigabyte’s M-series monitors have always showcased a solid balance between response times, color vibrance, screen clarity, and overdrive settings (which literally has “Balanced” as the best of settings). But more than that, the monitors also offer additional connectivity in the form of a USB-C charging port and two USB 3.0 passthrough connections, perfect if you want something else connected other than your PS5.

As for its true console experience, the M28U delivers absolutely superb response times, which is as expected of a current-generation IPS monitor. This is paired with an even better low input lag, which can help just a tiny bit in making reflex twitch games a bit less frustrating to play.

Unfortunately, as good as this monitor is for the price, some inherent weaknesses still make it just a tad bit less than perfect. Its bigger brother, the M32U for example, might feel more balanced with its screen size, though at a bigger retail cost.

Gigabyte Aorus FV43U, 43-inch 4K UHD 144Hz VA

(Keeping the Living Room Experience)

Size: 43-inch (16:9)
Resolution: 3840×2160 (4K UHD)
Refresh Rate: 144Hz
Panel Type: VA
Peak Brightness: 800-1,000 nits
Contrast Ratio: 4,500:1
Color Gamut: 99.1% sRGB, 98.4% Adobe, 87.8% DCI-P3
Best G2G Response: 10 ms
Dark Transition: More than 10 ms (12.78 ms)
Input Lag: 5 ms (average)
VRR: (reference only) Freesync (rated), G-SYNC (usable)
Ergonomics: No adjustment features

Advantages:

  • Great contrast ratio even among other VA panels
  • Very impressive picture quality
  • Semi-gloss panel

Disadvantages:

  • Price focused mostly on the size
  • Better used by one or two users only

Dual HDMI 2.1 ports, a large 40+ inch display, 4K resolution, plus a high refresh rate to boot. The Aorus FV43U definitely is designed from the ground up as a console gaming monitor. What’s even more peculiar, is that it uses a VA panel, which further cements its design purpose as an entertainment machine that’s solely focused on one or two players looking at it head-on.

At the top of its performance checklist is the somewhat balanced price for the package we are getting. True, it is still tagged with a premium price tag. But it costs just as much as your typical 32-inch 4K monitor, only with significantly larger screen size. Also, the investment comes with a nice bonus of very rich and deep blacks and wide color gamut, the experience of viewing which is even enhanced with the right visual content that can make use of its peak 1000 nits brightness.

Frame output-wise, the FV43U delivers a relatively nice 144Hz gaming experience, backed up by your standard Adaptive Sync options. Overall response time though only stands in the middle of the pack, and will be very noticeable for motion blur-sensitive players when gaming below 60Hz.

Build-wise, this monitor feels rather cheap-ish. No, not because of lower-than-standard quality. But because we would have wanted a more metallic build for a product of its price point. Ergonomics, seem to be out of the question as well. It is a 43-inch display, after all, so you simply have to account for the space where you’re going to place it.

Asus TUF Gaming VG28UQL1A, 28-inch 4K UHD 144Hz IPS

(If the M28U isn’t available)

Size: 28-inch (16:9)
Resolution: 3840×2160 (4K UHD)
Refresh Rate: 144Hz
Panel Type: IPS
Peak Brightness: 300 nits
Contrast Ratio: 1,000:1
Color Gamut: 98.2% sRGB, 78.7% Adobe, 83.4% DCI-P3
Best G2G Response: 4.5 ms
Dark Transition: Less than 10 ms (5 ms)
Input Lag: 5 ms (standard)
VRR: (reference only) Freesync (rated), G-SYNC (rated)
Ergonomics: Height, Tilt, Swivel

Advantages:

  • Great motion clarity delivering a true high refresh rate experience
  • Blow-per-blow performance with the M28U on similar product tiers
  • Has updated, latest-generation features and technologies

Disadvantages:

  • Somewhat weird, out-of-the-box color calibration
  • More expensive (as an alternative)

If you need to buy a monitor now and the M28U is somehow not available anywhere, then a good alternative would be the TUF Gaming VG28UQL1A. It’s priced within a similar-ish price tier (albeit this one is more expensive), has great motion clarity and response times for high refresh rate gaming, and has its suite of connectivity features that allow for multi-system setups aside from your PS5.

From a purely quantitative perspective, the TUF Gaming VG28UQL1A technically “loses” to its intended alternative. It’s just a tad bit less responsive (0.5 ms), and has an itsy bitsy input lag difference (1.0 ms). Practically for everyday PS5 use, however, this is almost imperceptible. The two monitors may as well be the same product, with the same modern IPS-level performance, and similar picture quality.

As a TUF Gaming series monitor, it does leave a bit more of a gamer-y aesthetic to it, which may or may turn off potential buyers of the product. It’s mostly just the shape and contours of the back and stand, though, so no RGB. As such, you’re not really paying more for features that are completely unnecessary for your PS5 gaming pleasure.

In the end, the biggest difference is really just the price. If the M28U is available, pick that one up first, no questions asked. But, you don’t have to splurge at least on the next best thing.

Samsung Odyssey G70A, 28inch 4K UHD 144Hz IPS

(The original Odyssey G7’s more bubbly cousin)

Size: 28-inch (16:9)
Resolution: 3840×2160 (4K UHD)
Refresh Rate: 144Hz
Panel Type: IPS
Peak Brightness: 350 nits
Contrast Ratio: 1,100:1
Color Gamut: 99.2% sRGB, 83.2% Adobe, 87.5% DCI-P3
Best G2G Response: 5 ms
Dark Transition: Less than 10 ms (7.5 ms)
Input Lag: 3.5 ms (average)
VRR: (reference only) Freesync (rated), G-SYNC (rated)
Ergonomics: Height, Tilt, Swivel


Advantages:

  • Significantly improved QC compared to previous Odyssey models
  • Very responsive, color-vibrant, modern IPS experience
  • Bit more decent blacks compared to most IPS panels

Disadvantages:

  • Half-assed local dimming

Samsung’s Odyssey product line, at least if you don’t get any QC issues out of the box, has always been at the forefront of pushing the panel technologies of a specific model to the extreme. The older VA panel G7’s for instance, display zero weaknesses of the panel type whatsoever, keeping up with IPS response times while maintaining the rich, deep blacks and wider color gamuts VA is loved for.

This smaller G7 is more or less the same. This time, the monitor compensates for the traditional IPS panel contrast ratio by bumping it up a notch, allowing it to rise above models such as the Eve Spectrum ES07D03 (4K 144Hz), and even the aforementioned M28U. Of course, this is all while delivering the solid IPS experience of its modern variants that we already adore.

Complementing its performance is its complete selection of (duplicate) video connections, complete adjustability features, and of course, its price, which goes toe-to-toe with our editor’s choice award. For those looking for a slightly muted design from the gaudier versions of Odyssey monitors, this one goes for a subtler look, making it ideal for a neutral visual setup for an integrated, multi-unit system.

Oh and, it may not be relevant to those exclusively using this monitor for a PS5, but this particular monitor is also officially G-SYNC certified. This means for the extra DisplayPort that it has, you can plug a PC to enjoy all the VRR advantages of the connection standard.

LG 27GP950 Ultragear, 27inch 4K UHD 144Hz (160Hz OC) Nano-IPS

(An Exorbitant Exception)

Size: 27-inch (16:9)
Resolution: 3840×2160 (4K UHD)
Refresh Rate: 144Hz
Panel Type: IPS
Peak Brightness: 700 nits
Contrast Ratio: 1,200:1
Color Gamut: 100% sRGB, Adobe 88.1%, 95.2% DCI-P3
Best G2G Response: 5 ms
Dark Transition: Less than 10 ms (7.5 ms)
Input Lag: 4 ms (average)
VRR: (reference only) Freesync (rated), G-SYNC (rated)
Ergonomics: Height, Tilt (No Swivel)

Advantages:

  • Nano-IPS delivers super rich color, bright visuals, and competitive response times
  • Balanced design combination of minimalist contours and back ambient light
  • True 95%+ DCI-P3 color gamut

Disadvantages:

  • Maybe a bit too small for a 4K monitor
  • Very expensive

So, if the M28U is the editor’s choice recommendation, why is the 27GP950(-B) the better selling 4K monitor on Amazon. Well, for one thing, it’s one of the best premium offerings of LG within its Ultragear product lineup right now. And second, it’s using a screen technology that is quite ahead of that of traditional IPS.

Ah yes, the fabled nano-IPS. First unveiled in 2019, it promises to deliver superior color accuracy and monstrous response times by adding a nano-particle layer within the liquid crystal substrate. The result is that color transitions feel much faster, and light passes through with much more vibrance. All at the cost of making the monitor much more expensive of course.

But, for those who simply want the optimal cinematic experience in playing PS5 games using a native HDMI 2.1 connection without sacrificing details or refresh rate, then this monitor is perhaps the best that will ever be for the next year or two.

As for its other perks, it has the traditional RGB ambient light feature prominent on high-end Ultragear monitors (a surprisingly useful option to match lighting for your battlestation). Several USB 3.0 passthrough connections and video ports also make it just as functional as a Gigabyte G-series monitor.

Best HDMI 2.1 Monitors for PS5: Frequently Asked Questions

Does the PS5 Natively Support 1440p Resolution?

Not at the moment, unfortunately. Not really sure why either, since Microsoft eventually added support for 1440p with the Xbox Series X/S later on. Just refer to the previous monitor requirements section for more details.

Will my games instantly play at 120Hz if I use a high-refresh-rate monitor?

No, it will not. It will depend largely if the game will support such modes, or if the game is hardware intensive enough not to provide the option. Either way, at least, you should still be able to play certain titles considerably above 60Hz.

Does the PS5 support Adaptive-Sync technologies?

No, the PS5 still does not support any adaptive sync feature at the moment, unfortunately. This means that Freesync and G-SYNC options for monitors are still largely useless for this console at the moment.

What does “Dynamic 4K” on certain PS5 games mean?

It means that while the game is rendered natively in 4K, it will lower the resolution on the fly in order to maintain the frame rates required to play the game smoothly. This happens instantaneously, within the instant, it is needed, and usually switches back to native 4K again in a snap after the hardware-intensive part was completed.

Can I use any random HDMI cable for HDMI 2.1?

Yes, but only if you plan to play in 1080p. If playing in 4K, it is better to double-check if the cable can output HDMI 2.1 by checking the official product specs, or by testing the cable on a separate PC connection where it can be benchmarked. Remember, HDMI 2.0 and below DOES NOT support 120Hz or higher refresh rates in 4K resolution.

Website | + posts

Leave a Comment