Best Monitors for the Xbox Series X

If you are looking for a gaming machine that can play the latest and greatest triple-A titles at respectable refresh rates, high resolutions, and awesome quality settings, then the Xbox Series X is possibly the best out of all of them. Software optimizations aside, it boasts graphical capabilities almost architecturally similar to a Ryzen 7 3700X and a Radeon RX 6700 XT.

Unfortunately, showcasing this monstrous computing power is not possible with a regular DisplayPort. The Xbox series X only supports HDMI connections, with a maximum version of HDMI 2.1 for the highest resolutions and refresh rates (4K + 144Hz). But don’t fret, we have a nice recommendation list that can unleash its modern-day gaming PC-level performance potential.

 

Basic Monitor Requirements of Xbox Series X

At least HDMI 2.0 support – Although the maximum spec allows for the use of HDMI 2.1 certified monitors, bandwidth-wise you only usually ever need an HDMI 2.0 connection for many of the available competitive monitor options for the Xbox Series X. Specifically, if you are aiming for 1080p/1440p 144Hz or 4K 60Hz, then you don’t need to use HDMI 2.1.

HDMI 2.1 if going 4K 144Hz – without DisplayPort and Thunderbolt, your only option if upping the 4K refresh rate to 120Hz is to use an HDMI 2.1 certified monitor. Practically this isn’t a strict requirement, but you may have a game played regularly that can make full use of the Xbox Series X’s 120 FPS cap limit when playing at 4K (Doom Eternal, Devil May Cry 5, F1 2021, etc.).

16:9 (Widescreen) aspect ratio – as of now, there is no official support for 21:9 ultrawide monitors for the Xbox Series X. You can use one, But it won’t be as optimized as a standard 16:9. As such, the more economical option is to stick to regular widescreen.

60Hz or 144Hz – If you need something that can be set up at a lower cost go for 4K 60Hz. For higher refresh rates go 144Hz, as it is the typical “entry-level” refresh rate for gaming monitors. It’s pointless to buy anything higher anyway even if it is available since the Xbox Series X is maxed at 120Hz.

IPS display (for 30-60-120Hz gaming) – today’s competitive IPS offerings generally look more vibrant and have significantly faster response times that virtually eliminate any ghosting or dark smearing. If you’re aiming for lower 60Hz scaled upwards to 120Hz, this will be the default recommendation.

VA display (for 60-120Hz gaming) – VA panels may be notorious for slower response times, but for higher overdrive settings and faster refresh rates at least 90Hz above, the sensation of ghosting and dark smearing (for those sensitive to it) can be virtually eliminated. VA displays also tend to be significantly cheaper than IPS, while still having exclusive advantages of their own such as very deep blacks and more natural color tones. In some models, VA weaknesses simply don’t exist at all, while still reaping all the color-rich benefits of the screen technology, such as the Odyssey G7 32-inch from Samsung.

Variable Refresh Rate/Adaptive Sync features – Unlike the PlayStation 5, the Xbox Series X is perfectly compatible with variable refresh rate features. If you’re playing at unlocked frame rates, it is highly recommended to get a monitor that at least supports Freesync (or in the rare case that it is exclusively Nvidia certified only, G-Sync).

Maybe You Still Want HDMI 2.1? Here are a Few Reasons Why

As established in our requirement list, there is no strict need to use HDMI 2.1 if you are not planning to go for a 4K 144Hz setup (Xbox Series X supports all mainstream 16:9 resolutions). However, some users might still prefer to use an HDMI 2.1 connection (certified monitor + cable) regardless, because of these optional advantages:

Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM) – also known as Auto Game Mode. It’s simply an option to enhance the speed of your controller inputs as it is shown in-game/on-screen.

Chroma Subsampling – 4K 120Hz will display 10-bit 4:4:4 color ratio, as opposed to 4:2:2 or 4:2:0. In other terms, the effective color information per 8×8 pixel is effectively doubled/quadrupled.

Enhanced Audio Return Channel (eARC) – assuming you even use the monitor for audio, which we assume you simply don’t.

HDMI 2.0/2.1 Monitors for Xbox Series X Overview:

Product Name Notable Specifications Check on Amazon
Gigabyte Aorus FV43U Size: 43-inch (16:9)

Resolution: 3840×2160
Refresh Rate: 144Hz

Panel Type: VA

Color Gamut: 99.1% sRGB, 98.4% Adobe, 87.8% DCI-P3

Link
Asus ROG Strix XG43UQ Size: 43-inch (16:9)

Resolution: 3840×2160
Refresh Rate: 144Hz

Panel Type: VA

Color Gamut: 94.0% sRGB, 89.4% Adobe, 81.0% DCI-P3

Link
Gigabyte M27Q Size: 27-inch (16:9)

Resolution: 2560×1440
Refresh Rate: 170Hz

Panel Type: IPS

Color Gamut: 99.7% sRGB, 97.3% Adobe, 85.8% DCI-P3

Link
BenQ Mobiuz EX2510 Size: 24.5-inch (16:9)

Resolution: 1920×1080
Refresh Rate: 144Hz

Panel Type: IPS

Color Gamut: 97.9% sRGB

Link
LG Ultragear 27GP950 Size: 27-inch (16:9)

Resolution: 3840×2160
Refresh Rate: 144Hz

Panel Type: IPS

Color Gamut: 100% sRGB, Adobe 88.1%, 95.2% DCI-P3

Link

1. Gigabyte Aorus FV43U, 43-inch 4K UHD 144Hz VA HDMI 2.1

Size: 43-inch (16:9)
Resolution: 3840×2160 (4K UHD)
Refresh Rate: 144Hz
Panel Type: VA
Peak Brightness: 800-1,000 nits
Contrast Ratio: 4,500:1
Color Gamut: 99.1% sRGB, 98.4% Adobe, 87.8% DCI-P3
Best G2G Response: 10 ms
Dark Transition: More than 10 ms (12.78 ms)
Input Lag: 5 ms (average)
VRR Freesync (rated), G-SYNC (usable)
Ergonomics: No adjustment features

Advantages:

  • Great contrast ratio even among other VA panels
  • Very impressive picture quality
  • Semi-gloss panel

Disadvantages:

  • Price focused mostly on size
  • Better used by one or two users only

No, no, don’t dismiss this panel simply because it is VA! The Aorus FV43U is definitely a fairly recent design with modern advantages in mind. In particular, its combination of wide color gamut and deep VA blacks make it the most cinematic and visually stunning monitors out of all in this list. This is reinforced, of course, by its huge 43-inch size as the current-generation living room TV.

Similar to how it performs using a PS5 console, the Aorus FV43U delivers a relatively nice 144Hz gaming experience on the Xbox Series X, backed up by your standard Adaptive Sync options. This is despite overall response time standing in the middle of the pack. If you’re mainly playing with 60Hz, and especially 120Hz modes in mind with this monitor, then you may as well forget any ghosting or dark smearing issue stereotypically associated with VA panels.

And speaking of VA, the Aorus FV43U even beats other VA panels within the competition, by combining its very high contrast ratio with its 1000 nits brightness.

Even though its price may seem higher than other entries in this list, the fact is that it is actually significantly cheaper. Like, this is usually the price that you would pay for a smaller, 32-inch 4K monitor sprinkled with mostly useless premium features for console-exclusive use. Well, the build quality might seem also cheap as a 40+inch monitor but still, in a way, you get a nice, balanced price for the package you are getting.

2. Asus ROG Strix XG43UQ, 43-inch 4K UHD 144Hz VA HDMI 2.1

Size: 43-inch (16:9)
Resolution: 3840×2160 (4K UHD)
Refresh Rate: 144Hz
Panel Type: VA
Peak Brightness: 1,000 nits
Contrast Ratio: 4,000:1
Color Gamut: 94.0% sRGB, 89.4% Adobe, 81.0% DCI-P3
Best G2G Response: 11 ms
Dark Transition: More than 10 ms (11.75 ms)
Input Lag: 5 ms (average)
VRR Freesync (rated), G-SYNC (rated)
Ergonomics: No adjustment features

Advantages:

  • Competitive contrast ratio (with the FV43U)
  • Punchy visuals, very strong colors
  • Premium build-quality and finish

Disadvantages:

  • Maybe a bit too premium

Here we have yet another specimen for big, but solo, super theatrical experience choice. The ROG Strix XG43UQ, much like the Aorus FV43U, focuses on providing the highest level cinematic experience for the console gamer, without having to sacrifice response times and input lag.

When compared with numerical values, the ROG Strix XG43UQ seems a little inferior to the Aorus FV43U. In practice, however, the two monitors are almost indistinguishable. Good 144Hz experience, middling response times, okay-ish input lag, but offset with its punchy colors, bright visuals, and higher-than-average deep VA blacks. Again, this is much less of a raw performance focus, and more of giving that wow factor when taking a good gander at your favorite Xbox Series X games.

One specific downside of the ROG Strix XG43UQ is its edge-lit local dimming feature. As many of you already know, this does not provide enough detail on points where the lighting should be provided. Thus, the HDR experience can get quite less spectacular than other high brightness monitors.

Oh, the monitor is also officially G-sync compatible by the way. Not sure how much of a difference that would make with your Xbox Series X setup, but it’s there for you to consider (other alternative uses for).

3. Gigabyte M27Q, 27inch 1440p QHD 144Hz (170Hz OC) IPS HDMI 2.0

Size: 27-inch (16:9)
Resolution: 2560x1440p (QHD)
Refresh Rate: 144Hz
Panel Type: IPS
Peak Brightness: 440 nits
Contrast Ratio: 1,200:1
Color Gamut: 99.7% sRGB, 97.3% Adobe, 85.8% DCI-P3
Best G2G Response: 5 ms
Dark Transition: Less than 10 ms (5.5 ms)
Input Lag: 3.5 ms (average)
VRR Freesync (rated), G-SYNC (usable)
Ergonomics: Height, Tilt, Swivel

Advantages:

  • Even cheaper than the M28U, without significant performance sacrifice
  • Balanced ergonomic adjustability
  • Full suite of connection options

Disadvantages:

  • HDR is garbage as usual
  • 170Hz effectively “useless” for pure Xbox Series X use

In a nutshell, the M27Q is simply a QHD clone of the M28U, wrapped in a much more affordable price range, without significant sacrifices to visual fidelity. And because the Xbox Series X officially supports 1440p, you can enjoy the current sweet spot in image detail, refresh rate, and price-to-performance that is currently enjoyed by most gaming PCs on the market today.

As an M-series monitor, it’s almost always packaged with an IPS panel that showcases very competitive response times, screen clarity, and overdrive settings that you can usually just set and forget at a single dial. Color vibrance is also well preserved, providing great color gamut values, although as an IPS, it falls short of VA’s deep blacks. Connectivity is provided for all data pass-throughs and video outputs, in case you want a hybrid desk setup, or you want to maximize its 170Hz refresh rate for other things (since the Xbox Series X caps at 120).

All in all within its price range and screen size, nothing beats the M27Q in terms of performance, a number of features, tweakable enhancements, and ergonomics. It’s not necessarily the lowest budget option, but it is certainly the most optimal choice if you absolutely don’t want anything left out. It is an investment worth getting into even outside being a dedicated video output peripheral for an Xbox Series X.

4. BenQ Mobiuz EX2510, 24.5inch 1080p FHD 144Hz IPS HDMI 2.0

Size: 24.5-inch (16:9)
Resolution: 1920×1080 (FHD)
Refresh Rate: 144Hz
Panel Type: IPS
Peak Brightness: 350 nits
Contrast Ratio: 900:1
Color Gamut: 97.9% sRGB
Best G2G Response: 4 ms
Dark Transition: Less than 10 ms (4 ms)
Input Lag: 3.5 ms (average)
VRR Freesync (rated), G-SYNC (usable)
Ergonomics: Height, Swivel (No Tilt)

Advantages:

  • Hands down, one of the most responsive FHD monitors ever
  • Surprisingly worth the premium price for its specs and features
  • Semi-unique build aesthetic with practicality in mind

Disadvantages:

  • Low contrast ratio
  • No other color gamut option (compared to this list)

For quite some time now, the AOC 24G2 has been the most dominant model on the FHD market due to its price-to-performance ratio. But, even though 1080p should traditionally be the budget option at this point, many consumers still opt to get more premium models of their specific gaming needs demands one. For an Xbox Series X monitor, perhaps the best one we can buy without wasting features is the Mobiuz EX2510.

At a glance, this monitor already exudes elements of being a premium monitor. A uniquely designed stand with an orange accent line at the front. Blocky-angled finished at the back. It even has a “conservative” port area that can safely hide away the cables easily without too much hassle.

In terms of raw numbers alone, the Mobiuz EX2510 takes out every other entry in this list. Even the LG27GP950 Ultragear, with is one of the fastest and most vibrant with its nano-IPS technology, struggles to edge out a wider gap with its response times and input lag. This is well supported by a single overdrive mode across all refresh rate settings, typical variable refresh rate support, and an almost perfect out-of-the-box default calibration preset.

Two possible deal-breaking downsides are its lower than average maximum brightness and contrast ratio compared to others in this list, but those can theoretically be solved simply by playing around with settings and room ambiance.

5. LG 27GP950 Ultragear, 27inch 4K UHD 144Hz (160Hz OC) Nano-IPS HDMI 2.1

Size: 27-inch (16:9)
Resolution: 3840×2160 (4K UHD)
Refresh Rate: 144Hz
Panel Type: IPS
Peak Brightness: 700 nits
Contrast Ratio: 1,200:1
Color Gamut: 100% sRGB, Adobe 88.1%, 95.2% DCI-P3
Best G2G Response: 5 ms
Dark Transition: Less than 10 ms (7.5 ms)
Input Lag: 4 ms (average)
VRR Freesync (rated), G-SYNC (rated)
Ergonomics: Height, Tilt (No Swivel)

Advantages:

  • Nano-IPS delivers super rich color, bright visuals, and competitive response times
  • Balanced design combination of minimalist contours and back ambient light
  • True 95%+ DCI-P3 color gamut

Disadvantages:

  • Maybe a bit too small for a 4K monitor
  • Very expensive

Without the strict requirement for 4K 144Hz for the Xbox Series X, the 27-inch form factor is usually best left for the sweet spot 1440p models, as demonstrated by the M27Q. Nevertheless, the 27GP950(-B) is still a very solid recommendation for those that can afford its advanced top-of-the-lime image immersion gimmicks. That’s right, it’s using a screen technology that is quite ahead of that of traditional IPS.

First unveiled in 2019, the fabled nano-IPS screen promised to deliver superior color accuracy and monstrous response times by adding a nano-particle layer within the liquid crystal substrate. The result is that color transitions feel much faster, and light passes through with much more vibrance. Indeed, the actual final product delivers as promised for the most part, albeit at the cost of making the monitor much, much more expensive.

It’s a high-end model. No questions asked. This is simply for those who want the optimal cinematic experience for the Xbox Series via a certified HDMI 2.1 connection at a size that is simply perfect for a desktop system.

As for its other perks, it has the traditional RGB ambient light feature prominent on high-end Ultragear monitors (a surprisingly useful option to match lighting for your battlestation). Several USB 3.0 passthrough connections and video ports also make it just as functional as any display model within its exorbitant tier range.

Best HDMI 2.1 Monitors for Xbox Series X: Frequently Asked Questions

1. Does the Xbox Series X Natively Support 1440p Resolution?

Yes, the Xbox Series X natively supports 1440p. As such, QHD monitors are usually the more default recommendation when setting up an Xbox Series X system. Details are noticeably better and the image is much crisper than 1080p, without having to spend too much on 4K monitor-level costs.

2. Will my games instantly play at 120Hz if I use a high-refresh-rate monitor?

No, it will not. It will depend largely if the game will support such modes, or if the game is hardware intensive enough not to provide the option (check some of the refresh mode confirmation lists online to confirm). Either way, at least, you should still be able to play certain titles considerably above 60Hz.

3. Does the Xbox Series X support Adaptive-Sync technologies?

Yes, the Xbox Series X supports both Freesync and G-Sync features. Though, when looking for variable refresh rate features on a monitor, just check if it is Freesync compatible. That alone is more than enough to provide a screen tearing-free gaming experience.

4. What does “Dynamic 4K” on certain Xbox Series X games mean?

It means that while the game is rendered natively in 4K, it will lower the resolution on the fly in order to maintain the frame rates required to play the game smoothly. This happens instantaneously, within the instant it is needed, and usually switches back to native 4K again in a snap after the hardware-intensive part was completed.

5. Can I use any random HDMI cable?

Yes and no. If playing below 4K (or 4K 60Hz), just be sure that the cable is purchased recently enough (last three years or so), or the length short enough for bandwidth issues to not matter much. If using a 4K 144Hz monitor, you might want to hook up an HDMI 2.1-certified cable to maximize refresh rates on well-optimized titles.

Website | + posts

Leave a Comment