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Best TVs for Garage (Budget TVs 2022)

TVs aren’t just for the living rooms and bedrooms. Having one in your garage while you’re working on some project is a great way to keep yourself fresh and entertained.

But, picking one up for your garage differs from choosing one for the living room. You don’t need the most robust TV for garage use, where you’ll only be for short periods. The expensive and more powerful options are suitable for living room spaces.

Best TVs for Garage – Comparison Table

ImageProductDetailsCheck Price
TCL 65-inch Class 6-Series Smart TV on Amazon
TCL 65-inch Class 6-Series Smart TV Screen Size: 65-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160 (4k)
Panel Type: QLED
Refresh Rate: 120Hz
HDR Support: Dolby Vision, HDR10, and HLG
Ports:
4 x HDMI (2 x with 4k@120Hz and 2 x with 4k@60Hz),
2 x USB Type-A,
1 x Ethernet,
1 x RF Cable input,
3.5mm composite video input,
3.5mm headphone jack,
1 x optical audio input
Buy on Amazon
Hisense ULED 4K 50U6G Smart TV on Amazon
Hisense ULED 4K 50U6G Smart TV Screen Size: 50-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160 (4k)
Panel Type: QLED
Refresh Rate: 60Hz
HDR Support: Dolby Vision and HDR10+
Ports:
4 x HDMI 2.0,
2 x USB 2.0 Type-A,
1 x Ethernet,
1 x RF Cable input,
1 x Composite Video input,
1 x 3.5mm headphone jack
Buy on Amazon
VIZIO 50-inch MQX Series TV on Amazon
VIZIO 50-inch MQX Series TV Screen Size: 50-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160 (4k)
Panel Type: QLED
Refresh Rate: 120Hz
HDR Support: Dolby Vision and HDR10+
Ports:
4 x HDMI,
1 x USB 2.0 Type-A,
1 x RF Cable Input,
1 x Optical Audio jack,
1 x 3.5mm headphone jack,
1 x Ethernet
Buy on Amazon
LG 80 Series 55-inch Smart TV on Amazon
LG 80 Series 55-inch Smart TV Screen Size: 55-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160 (4k)
Panel Type: IPS LED
Refresh Rate: 60Hz (Truemotion 120Hz)
HDR Support: HDR10 and HLG
Ports:
3 x HDMI 2.0,
2 x USB 2.0 Type-A,
1 x Digital/Optical Audio out,
1 x RF Cable input,
1 x Ethernet
Buy on Amazon
Sony X80K 50-inch Google TV on Amazon
Sony X80K 50-inch Google TV Screen Size: 50-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160 (4k)
Panel Type: IPS LED
Refresh Rate: 60Hz
HDR Support: Dolby Vision, HDR10 and HLG
Ports:
4 x HDMI 2.0,
2 x USB Type-A (1 x 3.0),
1 x Composite Video in,
1 x Digital Audio out,
1 x Ethernet,
1 x RF Cable input
Buy on Amazon
Samsung Q60A 32-inch QLED TV on Amazon
Samsung Q60A 32-inch QLED TV Screen Size: 32-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160 (4k)
Panel Type: QLED
Refresh Rate: 60Hz
HDR Support: HDR10, HDR10+, and HLG
Ports:
3 x HDMI 2.0,
2 x USB 2.0 Type-A,
1 x Ethernet,
1 x Digital/Optical Audio Out,
1 x RF Cable input
Buy on Amazon
Amazon Fire Omni Series 55-inch TV on Amazon
Amazon Fire Omni Series 55-inch TV Screen Size: 55-inch
Resolution: 3840 x 2160 (4K)
Panel Type: VA LED
Refresh Rate: 60Hz
HDR Support: HDR10, HLG
Ports:
4 x HDMI (1 x HDMI 2.1),
1 x USB 2.0 Type-A,
1 x Ethernet,
1 x 3.5mm Headphone jack,
1 x IR Emitter,
1 x Digital/Optical Audio out,
1 x RF Cable input
Buy on Amazon

1. TCL 65-inch Class 6-Series Smart TV

At the top of the list sits the TCL Class 6-Series Smart TV, and that’s because it’s a complete package that’s not hard on the pocket.

It is a massive 65-inch 4k display with quantum dot technology. So even if your garage is quite spacious, you can enjoy the crisp image quality of 4k on a giant screen from anywhere in your garage.

The TV comes in with Google TV smart interface with features like Google Cast and hands-free Google Assistant. The color reproduction and contrast ratio are just what a consumer would want, thanks to the QLED quantum dot panel technology.

For HDR, the TV supports various formats, from HDR10 to HDR10+, HLG, and even Dolby Vision. So, it doesn’t matter what format the content is; you can enjoy it smoothly. The peak brightness in both SDR and HDR is impressive too.

Even though mini-LED backlighting is present to improve local dimming, it doesn’t compare to high-end TVs in the industry. So, you might have to compromise here a little. Plus, the VA sub-panel would cause narrow viewing angles.t.

Our Take

The TCL Class 6-Series is all you need in a garage to keep yourself entertained however you like. It delivers un-rivaled colors, contrast ratio, and HDR performance at a price that will not be hard on the pocket.


PROS
  • Impressive native contrast ratio
  • 4k@120Hz
  • Satisfying peak brightness in both SDR and HDR
  • Wide HDR format compatibility
CONS
  • Narrow viewing angles
  • Local dimming can be improved

2. Hisense ULED 4K 50U6G Smart TV

Next is the Hisense ULED 4k Smart TV with a screen size of 50-inch.

The key factors that earned this TV the second spot on our list are its outstanding black uniformity and excellent native contrast. These traits make this TV ideal for watching movies and sports. As for the Smart TV OS, it comes with an Android TV interface.

Plus, it delivers rich colors and sharp visuals thanks to the 4k QLED panel it boasts. The TV covers 95% of the DCI-P3 color gamut for rich color reproduction. For HDR content, it supports Dolby Vision and HDR10+ formats. But the peak brightness in HDR isn’t bright enough for tiny highlights in some scenes.

Due to excellent black uniformity and contrast, it displays deep blacks with nearly no blooming. A decent array of 32 local dimming zones is also there to further improve contrast.

For connectivity, you’ve got 4 HDMI 2.0 (no 2.1 option, unfortunately), 2 x USB Type-A, 1 RF Cable input, one ethernet RJ45 jack, a headphone jack, and one composite video input. So, it’s a decent selection of ports.

Despite the VA panel’s excellent contrast ratio, it still lacks wide viewing angles. So, the image colors will wash out as you move to a wider angle from the TV.

Our Take

This TV is the pick for you if you’re after one with minimum compromises and affordable prices while having an excellent visual experience. It delivers outstanding HDR performance, rich colors, and a screen size that’s just the sweet spot.


PROS
  • Wide Color Gamut
  • Excellent contrast and black uniformity
  • Satisfying HDR performance
CONS
  • Narrow viewing angles
  • Not the best peak brightness in HDR

3. VIZIO 50-inch MQX Series TV

Over the years, Vizio couldn’t compete in the budget segment with TCL and Hisense. But this 50-inch MQX Smart TV marks a comeback in this segment for Vizio.

It features a 4k Quantum dot QLED panel with a smooth 120Hz refresh rate. There’s also support for AMD FreeSync Premium Pro VRR(Variable Refresh Rate) to eliminate screen-tearing if gaming is on your list.

The contrast ratio is an excellent 8000:1, and the TV displays rich, deep blacks. Color coverage is where this TV outpaces its competition (albeit by a tiny margin). Especially the HDR color coverage is where this panel shines. It covers the DCI-P3 wide gamut ~98% and sometimes even exceeds that.

Speaking of HDR, this TV supports HDR content with HDR10, HDR10+, and Dolby Vision formats. So, enjoy HDR content to your heart’s desire. But don’t expect it to get too bright in HDR. It does exceed its rated 400nits sustained and gets around 443nits sustained peak brightness.

It features Vizio’s in-house, easy-to-use, simple SmartCast OS, which supports Apple AirPlay and Google Cast.

In connectivity, on the back of the TV, there are 4 HDMI ports (one with eARC and one supporting 4k@120Hz input), an ethernet port, one USB Type-A, an RF Cable-input, a headphone jack, and one optical audio output. A decent enough port selection, indeed.

Our Take

This is your go-to pick if you’re after a TV that delivers excellent color coverage and impressive HDR compatibility on a budget. Packed with powerful features like a high refresh rate and FreeSync, this TV will run circles around its competition at this price.


PROS
  • Impressive color coverage
  • Powerful Gaming features
  • Wide HDR content compatibility
CONS
  • Not bright enough in HDR
  • Only one USB-Type A

4. LG 80 Series 55-inch Smart TV

Here’s one from the renowned company LG. It’s their 55UP8000 55-inch Smart TV.

It features a 4k ADS(Advanced Plane-to-line Switching), the same as an IPS panel. Which means good color accuracy and wider viewing angles. So, it’ll be ideal for you if you move to different angles from your TV while working.

It’s equipped with LG’s innovative WebOS interface, arguably one of the best Smart TV interfaces out there.

Now, let’s talk about the contrast ratio a little bit. Due to being a panel from the IPS family, it suffers in this category. It only has a measly 900:1 contrast ratio that makes deep blacks look gray. To add salt to injury, LG didn’t care to equip this TV with a local dimming feature to improve contrast.

HDR is supported, however, not to a satisfying extent. The standard HDR10 and HLG formats are supported. That can be enough for you, depending on your needs.

But the low contrast ratio won’t let you enjoy the HDR content that much. So, you won’t enjoy it in a dark room. But then again, your garage will probably be adequately lit for the work.

Speaking of light, the TV also doesn’t get bright enough to fight intense levels of glare.

The build quality is what’s never been disappointing for LG products. And that’s the case here as well. It features a sturdy build, even though it’s all plastic, and there’s no visible flex in the chassis. The stands are made out of steel and don’t wobble if your surface is flat.

Our Take

The LG 55UP8000 is for you if you want a TV with wide viewing angles and sturdy build quality. The contrast ratio and brightness can be a deal breaker if you care about them, but if your garage has adequate lighting, it won’t be that much of an issue.


PROS
  • Wide viewing angles
  • Sturdy build quality
  • Satisfying smart OS
CONS
  • Sub-par contrast ratio
  • No local-dimming

5. Sony X80K 50-inch Google TV

The Sony 50-inch X80K is an entry-level product from Sony’s lineup of TVs. Even though it doesn’t sit close to the high-end TVs of the Sony lineup, it still delivers enough performance to sit in a garage.

This TV features a 4k IPS panel and Google TV OS in a 50-inch form. The refresh rate is the standard 60Hz, and there’s no VRR technology. But, to think of it, a TV in a garage is mainly to keep you entertained while you glide through your work, not for fidelity gaming.

HDR10, Dolby Vision, and HLG formats are supported, allowing the TV to stream wide forms of HDR content. But due to having sub-par peak brightness in HDR, the highlights won’t pop out as the content creator intended them to.

Due to boasting an IPS panel, the TV delivers wide viewing angles and good color accuracy with 90% coverage of a wide DCI-P3 color gamut.

But the generic problem with low contrast ratio IPS panels won’t let you enjoy HDR fully.

In terms of chassis, it’s all plastic, with only the feet being made of metal. That’s good because if you intend to use the feet, there’ll be no wobble. But the plastic frame isn’t the strongest, and you can easily see it flex.

At the back of the chassis, there are 4 HDMI ports (one with eARC support), 2 x USB Type-A with one of them having USB 3.0 support, an RF cable port, one ethernet, one composite video in, and one digital/optical audio out.

Our Take

The Sony X80K is an all-around okay TV for watching sports and movies at wide angles.


PROS
  • Wide viewing angles
  • Broad support for HDR content
  • Wide color gamut
CONS
  • Sub-par contrast ratio
  • A little bit of flex in the frame

6. Samsung Q60A 32-inch QLED TV

Rounding up next is the Q60A 32-inch QLED Smart TV from Samsung, which is the creator of QLED TV technology, and its implementation of it is arguably the best.

This TV features Samsung’s same VA QLED panel technology that you’ll see on its flagship QLED TVs with a 4k resolution and a 60Hz refresh rate. The TV also upscales lower-resolution content to an impressive extent. The screen size is what I’ll consider modest and not optimal. Because if your garage is spacious, then it might feel tiny.

Nonetheless, the contrast and black uniformity are excellent, with a 4700:1 ratio. So, there’ll be rich colors and deep blacks for your eyes to indulge in. The brightness is enough to support the contrast for an adequate HDR experience. But it isn’t bright enough to deliver an actual cinematic HDR experience like Samsung’s flagship TVs.

As for HDR compatibility, there’s support for HDR10, HDR10+, and HLG format to make this TV compatible with various forms of HDR content.

In HDR, ~92% coverage of the wide DCI-P3 color gamut is seen, which can deliver near true-to-life colors in HDR mode.

The smart Operating System for this TV is Samsung’s Tizen OS which is a good option for almost everyone due to having a user-friendly interface and an abundance of apps.

The build quality of the chassis is decent, just not premium. Because it’s not a premium product in the first place, however, it’s relatively sturdy and doesn’t show any flex despite being all-plastic.

For connectivity, at the back of the TV, you get 3 HDMI 2.0 (one of them with eARC support as well), 2 USB 2.0 Type-A ports, an Ethernet RJ45 jack, one Digital/Optical Audio Out, and one RF Cable input for the TV. These are all the ports you’ll need for a TV in the garage.

Our Take

The Q60A 32-inch QLED Smart TV from Samsung is an all-around excellent TV with a rich contrast ratio and HDR performance. The only noticeable caveats are the less-than-optimal 32-inch screen size and the old VA problem of narrow viewing angles.


PROS
  • Rich Deep blacks
  • Impressive upscaling for lower-resolution content
  • Excellent selection of apps from Samsung Tizen
CONS
  • 32-inch might not be the optimal screen size

7. Amazon Fire Omni Series 55-inch TV

Last but certainly not least on our list is Amazon’s Fire Omni Smart TV. It features Amazon’s Fire TV OS based on Android OS but doesn’t allow installing Android TV apps.

It’s a 55-inch VA panel with a native resolution of 3840 x 2160 (4k). It has an introductory 60Hz refresh rate and doesn’t have any advanced gaming features like VRR or low-input lag (for cost-cutting purposes, obviously).

The TV has a primarily plastic yet incredibly sturdy and premium feeling build than its previous iterations. There’s no flex in the body due to having a metal backplate. The feet don’t wobble unless you’re putting the TV on an uneven surface.

There’s an excellent 5200:1 contrast ratio that we often see in VA panels like this. However, if there were a quantum dot layer and local-dimming technology, then it’d been even better, but sadly those are non-existent.

Despite having excellent contrast, the 320nits peak brightness is nowhere near a satisfying HDR experience, let alone a cinematic one. Plus, such low brightness would cause glares in a well-lit area. But SDR brightness is enough to handle middling light reflections.

Another caveat in terms of HDR is its low compatibility with formats. In the 55-inch model of this TV, you’ll only get HDR10 and HLG format support and no advanced form such as Dolby Vision HDR.

There’s also the problem that’s accustomed to the previous models of Amazon TVs of poor pre-calibration of colors. But, after proper calibration, the color accuracy is enough to display accurate colors in movies and sports.

Despite everything, the apps selection and features of Amazon Fire TV OS such as Alexa and Netflix, Prime Video, YouTube, Disney+, HBO Max, Peacock, IMDb TV, Pluto TV, Tubi, Paramount+, and many more to watch your favorites.

For connectivity, Amazon has hooked you up with a decent array of ports to utilize the TV in whatever functionality you like. At the back of the chassis are 4 HDMI ports(1 x HDMI 2.1 with eARC), a USB 2.0 Type-A, an Ethernet RJ45 jack, one 3.5mm Headphone jack, an IR Emitter, one Digital/Optical Audio out, and the RF Cable input.

Our Take

All in all, Amazon’s Fire Omni Series Smart TV is an okay option if you’re willing to compromise on HDR performance and can spend time calibrating it for color accuracy. But, besides that, it’s the right pick for your garage space.


PROS
  • Excellent Contrast Ratio
  • Nice library of streaming apps built-in
  • Sturdy build quality
CONS
  • Colors need calibration for accuracy
  • Not bright enough for HDR

Choosing the Best TVs for Garage – Buying Guide

For picking up a TV for your garage, you’ll need to keep track of certain key factors contributing to delivering an epic visual experience. Let’s look at those factors in detail.

Resolution

The first and foremost factor to consider for a TV in 2022 is the resolution, hands-down. Because why not? You want to enjoy high-definition movies and like the content to look its best.

It is essential to understand that you don’t need the most overkill resolution, like 8k, in your garage. 4k TVs are the best choice for any place. Plus, you can save a great deal of money than 8k options.

But we also won’t recommend going below 4k since you can find TVs with 4k panels at a reasonable price without much trouble. The UHD resolution will also complement the ample screen space of your TV. A lower resolution will make it harder to notice details if you’re garage is spacious, and you’re not near the TV.

So, don’t look for anything besides 4k since it doesn’t sit at an absurdly higher price than lower-resolution panels. That’s why you’ll notice only 4k resolution panels on our list.

Screen Size

For the screen size of a TV, the sweet spot without hurting your wallet is 50 – 55 inches.

However, in some rare cases, 65-inch is possible, like the TCL pick on this list. But any higher than that is just crazy to expect in any affordable manner and, if found, would be one out of hundreds of a product.

And if you think logically, you don’t need a gigantic screen in a place like a garage. 50-55 inches works fine; any higher than that is just the cherry on top. However, you can go even below if your garage space isn’t super large.

HDR Support

HDR(High Dynamic Range) support is gradually becoming a must-have in TVs because why not?

HDR content delivers higher color tones, brightness levels, and contrasts than SDR. Streaming platforms like Netflix and Prime Video are getting more and more HDR content by the day. So, it makes sense to have a TV compatible with a decent range of HDR formats.

HDR10, HDR10+, and Dolby Vision HDR are HDR’s most widely utilized formats. HDR10 is easily found on a TV these days, but it’s not the highest standard. Some better TVs will also have HDR10+, and some excellent picks include Dolby Vision.

All three ensure that you enjoy HDR content on any platform, regardless of the format. However, TVs with broader HDR support will cost more.

Panel Type

This factor shouldn’t be ever ignored. The panel type of your TV decides its color quality, contrast, saturation, etc. While OLED is the prime standard of the industry, TVs with excellent OLED panels are nowhere near affordable.

That leaves us with typical IPS LED and VA panels. Both of them don’t scale up to the performance of the OLED but still get the job done just fine.

What to actually look for is quantum dot or QLED panel technology. This can significantly boost your TV’s color saturation, contrast ratio, and brightness levels. These typically have a VA panel as a sub-type and can cost a little more than regular IPS panels.

But IPS will have an advantage with wider viewing angles than the VA panels.

Best TVs for Garage – Frequently Asked Questions

What smart interface is best?

It mostly boils down to your personal preference and what interface you like. Whether you’re comfortable with ROKU TV, Google TV, Android TV, etc., will decide the answer to this question.

Do we need higher refresh rates?

Most users will be okay with the reasonable 60Hz refresh rate. But if you also plan on hooking up your PS5 or Xbox with the TV for gaming, higher refresh TVs would be the pick for you. A TV with a 120Hz refresh rate will deliver all you need but with some added price.

Is a bigger screen always better?

That’s not always true. Sure, a bigger screen will deliver a tremendous viewing experience. If your garage is quite spacious, a bigger screen then is the option. But going for a gigantic TV isn’t logical if it’s not.

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I like to educate people about everything I know regarding tech. This ended up being a hobby for me and I embraced it in the form of writing.